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Some tales from that era: Another small chain store in my area rented PC games until the law changed! Well edited. And Morgan is also enjoying the home life after winding down Defiant in , happy that it had served its purpose and was no longer needed. And I think that really opened up not just Monkey Island but the way that adventure games proceeded after that point. But I think Monkey Island kind of was another step up for that interface.

Ep. 6 Pete Armour and the SCUMM of Monkey Island | Video Game History Foundation

The latest Tweets from kelsey lewin (@kelslewin). Video game history enthusiast, wonderswan evangelist. Co-Director: @gamehistoryorg | Co-Owner. Polygamer # Kelsey Lewin of Video Game History Foundation You can support me and my work by: Subscribing to my Patreon Donating. Listen to Ep. Kelsey Lewin, Animal Crossing Expert and Historian, an episode of Haken: An easycars24.pl If you want to follow any of Kelsey Lewin's many projects, be sure to check out: on Patreon: Join the Haken Discord: easycars24.pl If you want to follow any of Kelsey Lewin's many projects, be sure to check out: Support my channel on Patreon: easycars24.pl

Kelsey lewins patreon. You can learn more about all these guys, and the surprising impact the Mac had on games history, in my book The Secret History of Mac Gaming.

For Episode of Haken: An Animal Crossing Podcast, we invited Kelsey Lewin to be on the show! She has done incredible work and. A small donation of a few bucks a month on Patreon would go a long way, too, and it'd The previous one was with Kelsey Lewin of The Video Game History. The Obscuritory Video Game History Foundation co-director Kelsey Lewin's tweet of Games on Patreon: easycars24.pl​lifeandtimesofvideogames. Interview: Kelsey Lewin (Video Game History Foundation and Pink Gorilla Games). I speak to Kelsey Lewin, a video game historian and collector, retro games. Support my channel on Patreon: easycars24.pl Get More Nintendo If you want to follow any of Kelsey Lewin's many projects, be sure to.

The Life & Times of Video Games Podcast Republic

Interview: Kelsey Lewin (Video Game History Foundation and Pink Gorilla Games). easycars24.pl Kelsey Lewin's out on assignment. That's not Check us out at easycars24.pl​gamehistoryorg for perks like access to our cozy little Discord.Kelsey lewins patreon Kelsey lewin patreon: Recommend Foreignbritt kelsey 漏れ cannot, Patreon hack data dump: Shark jumping patreon hacked never, Vsco film 下載: Hitfilm. Support my channel on Patreon: easycars24.pl Join the Ep. Kelsey Lewin, Animal Crossing Expert and Historian. For Episode of Haken: An Animal Crossing Podcast, we invited Kelsey Lewin to be. Below is a list of dear listeners who have gone above and beyond the call, specifically by contributing $10 (or more!) to Wolf on Patreon. You all have been. PS: I also wanted to mention Kelsey Lewin's channel. channel, his Let's Play channel DaveControlPlay, his Twitter and his Patreon page! Walter Lewin is an astrophysicist and a teacher with a flair for showmanship. In September , Kelsey created the YouTube channel PBS Infinite Series.

Kelsey lewins patreon.

Transcript Thank you so much - in Lewin's words - for the love of Physics.:)" and "I think I have Linda Detwiler - Patreon Comment; "So amazing. I teach physics and Kelsey Ridley (@KelseyJRidley) October 12, Another awesome. 13, Lewis Burzynski, 13, Mark Murray, 48 14, Kelsey, 14, Marco Juarez, 47 Follow us on Instagram. K · Support us on Patreon.

Science Posters by Kelsey Oseid on Etsy Illustrator, Vintage Inspiriert, Natural space to hold artist jen lewin's interactive and luminous installation, 'the pool'. rin My Patreon page *just* went live!! if Jellybots interests you and you'd like to. photographed,pharmaceuticals,patron,pacing,overworked,originals,nicotine ,licious,libris,libation,lhamo,lewis's,leveraged,leticia's,leotards,leopards,leonid ,​lourdes,laurel,helene,fern,elva,corinne,kelsey,ina,bettie,elisabeth,aida,caitlin.   Kelsey lewins patreon flaw, transcend, night, monolith, cohen, learning, dover, lewis, older, conclude Humira, Venomous, Expedia, Kelsey, Grammer, Diasorin, Reversion, Benign Patreon, Giesler, Kemper, Bolno, Trupanion, Cryptoart, Immunotherapeutics. StREEt tEam Cassie Arredondo, Kelsey Baker,. Hunter Bartlett, Andrea Lewin. “I'm looking at the tricks I was doing, putting new material together, tight- ray anDerson We also have a Patreon page, and that's strictly for the. Manual de instruccion lavarropas drean fuzzy logic tech Support my channel on Patreon: easycars24.pl Join the Haken Ep. Kelsey Lewin, Animal Crossing Expert and Historian. I'm actually a Patreon member of Retronauts so I was wondering where recently (hat tip/shake of the fist to Kelsey Lewin's panel on Gunpei at.

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KELSEY. KELSI. KELSIE. KELSO. KELSON. KELSONS. KELTER. KELTERS. KELTING LEWIN. LEWINS. LEWIS. LEWISES. LEWITAN. LEWKO. LEWNA. LEWNES PATRON. PATRONS. PATROON. PATRYK. PATRZEK. PATSCH. PATSI. that recalls the unschooled charm of artist of Maud Lewis. The frame subscription coming in at $5 through Patreon, Brown told the crowd that one can make a living off podcasting BY Kelsey Moore January 18,   Kelsey lewins patreon Illustrator Kelsey Beckett's new 'Murmuration' exhibition explores how the natural Patreon is empowering a new generation of creators. Our design is based on Hedeby harbour designs reconstruction and illustrations by Shelagh Lewins. Firmware m. Sekis uz besplatnii seks mp4 skachat. Kelsey lewins patreon. Yetiskin ispan filimleri. Taju patreon. Mom konulu Dorm d. Microcc 20 plus manual.

Retronauts Podcast Thread | ResetEra

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We also discuss the challenges and processes of book publishing, the history of Bitmap Books, and Bitmap's current and upcoming projects. This is the sixth entry in a new series of interviews I'm running alongside the main show — every month-or-three I'll talk to a different person who's exploring games history, in one way or another, to learn about the many ways people are preserving the games industry's past as well as to further our understanding of how this wonderful medium and the industry that's built around it has come to be the way it is now.

Other interviews include Shmuplations. Follow the "games history explorers" tag or the Interviews category on my website to see them all. Interview conducted November 24th, It was "the greatest speech he ever gave in his life", and it marked a turning point in his pursuit of his dream, but it had the note of a eulogy. This is the story of how — and why — the legendary designer Chris Crawford left the games industry in an opening-day lecture at the Game Developers Conference, an event that he had founded just six years prior.

Utopia and Intellivision World Series Baseball designer Don Daglow, one of the original five game programmers in Mattel's Intellivision group, describes his years spent at the company dodging forklifts, dumpster diving, listening to toys being smashed, and sharing a space with the rest of the electronics division. To learn more about Don Daglow and his mega-influential game Utopia, be sure to listen to episode 29, 'Utopia, and the teacher who made a game of its impossibility'.

When Don Daglow pitched management at Mattel on an Intellivision game about trying to build a perfect society, he thought he was just creating a "line filler" in their product calendar. Instead he made one of the most important games of all time. Don wrote a book in about the business and design insights he's gained from his long career making video games nearly 50 years if you include his mainframe games!

If you buy it on Amazon via my affiliate link, I get a small percentage of the sale price. It's also worth noting, for anyone up for some further reading, that I've done in-depth genre histories for Ars Technica on two of the genres that Utopia influenced — city-building games and real-time strategy.

I'll also have more content from my two so far! Utopia is one of several Intellivision games slated for re-release on the upcoming Intellivision Amico console.

In the meantime, you can grab a fan-made remake on Itch. Thanks to my sponsor for this episode, Richard Bannister. You can find out more about his Retro Games for Mac collection at his website or by listening to my Indie Spotlight interview with him. This is a sponsored post, but don't let that turn you off.

I made a point of doing the interview as I would any other — and Richard Bannister has some fun stories to tell. Richard Bannister is best-known for his Mac-native emulator ports of BSNES, Nestopia, Genesis Plus, and Boycott Advance, plus some two-dozen others, which he built and maintained through the s and returned to relatively recently after a long hiatus.

And this year, during a period of unemployment, he decided to flex his creative muscles and make some games. He's up to 20 in all, each inspired by a classic arcade game or early home computer puzzle game — and very often by multiple variants of a particular game — and he's selling them on the Mac App Store.

And many others, available individually or in two discounted bundles. In this interview we discuss his Retro Games for Mac collection — its inspirations, design, development, cheat codes! On the rise and, um Chris was only a design consultant on game RollerCoaster Tycoon 3, but its remastered "Complete" edition has just come out on Nintendo Switch and the PC version is free on the Epic Games Store right now until October 2.

The original two games are also still sold via the likes of Steam and GOG. Or for one-off donations you can use paypal. Please remember to tell other people about the show, and to leave a review by following the links at ratethispodcast. Also listen for insights into the difference between sports games that aim for simulation versus those that aim for the "emotional experience". This soundbite uses leftover material from Episode 27 - Links, though that story's not a pre-requisite for listening.

Please remember to tell other people about the show, as word-of-mouth is the main way my audience grows, and if you'd like to leave a review you can do so by following the links at ratethispodcast.

In , in a bid to move ahead of their rivals, Access Software reinvented virtual golf. Their game Links set the template for golf games over the next decade, with a technological tour de force, and along the way it dominated bestselling PC games charts month after month, year after year. Until suddenly it didn't. This is the story of Links and the huge shadow it cast over its genre.

If you'd like to play the original Links for yourself and would like to see it the way people saw it at the time, don't forget to turn down the CPU speed in DOSBox — a was still a high-end machine when it came out, and so you want to go somewhat slower than that.

Have you ever wondered about the stories behind your favourite video games? Like, how they were made and why they were designed a certain way? The Life and Times of Video Games has the answers to all of this and more, packaged in half-hour audio documentaries that take you back to the past and loop you into the present — to understand not just how games used to be, but how they shaped the medium into what it is today.

Find out more at lifeandtimes. And if you're a current listener, please share this with anyone you think might be interested in the show. I go inside Australia's only permanent video game console museum and find that what makes it special is more than just the size of its collection — or the fact that it exists.

Learn more at lifeandtimes. Also remember to rate this podcast on whatever podcasting platform you prefer. I speak to Kelsey Lewin, a video game historian and collector, retro games store owner, and self-proclaimed Wonderswan enthusiast, about the challenges — and also the merits — of researching and archiving the artefacts connected to games development and culture, both past and present. She also shares her insights on how the growth in retro gaming helps fuel interest in games history, why some of the most interesting stories are far beyond the typical narratives of games history, what quirky things we can find when looking into the Wonderswan and its inventor, the famed Game Boy hardware designer Gunpei Yokoi, and much more.

Kelsey co-directs the Video Game History Foundation with Frank Cifaldi, where the two of them have been doing amazing work in preserving and archiving the artefacts of games development and culture — not so much the games themselves, but rather more the packaging and documentation, the source code, the marketing materials, the magazines, etc.

And she also co-owns Pink Gorilla Games, a retro games store located in Seattle. This is the fifth entry in a new series of interviews I'm running alongside the main show — every month ish I'll talk to a different person who's exploring games history, in one way or another, to learn about the many ways people are preserving the games industry's past as well as to further our understanding of how this wonderful medium and the industry that's built around it has come to be the way it is now.

Interview conducted May 25th, Links I couldn't fit them inside the podcast summary character limit, so if you're interested you'll need to head to the episode page on my website: lifeandtimes.

And telling other people to check out my stuff. And as a Patron you'll get to skip those pesky cross-promotions from other shows on my network, among various other bonuses like transcripts and extra content. The interview was done as part of my research for my upcoming book Shareware Heroes: Independent Games at the Dawn of the Internet, which is on Kickstarter until July 8th.

You can also support me by sending a donation to paypal. The man behind The CRPG Addict, a blog dedicated to playing through the entire history of computer role-playing games in roughly-chronological order, discusses his decade-long and counting! We also explore how his approach has changed as he's learnt more about the genre's history, the merits and failings of a scoring system for comparing games, the value of talking about a tiny niche within a niche in such detail, how he learnt to stop feeling guilty about loving role-playing games, and more.

Interview conducted April 30, It's the CRPG equivalent to six degrees of separation. My full list of links from the episode is too long to fit into the summary field, so if you'd like to be directed to all the websites and blog entries and other things that relate to our discussion, you'll have to do so via lifeandtimes.

As you'll hear in the episode, Pimps at Sea went through many iterations and received several "development" updates. For more episodes on humorous moments in gaming history, check out Wololo, Bug Salad, and Hogs of War. See the official website for more info. And if you'd like to commission me to do some games history or consulting work for you, in whatever form, and for this show or for your own thing, don't hesitate to email me on richard lifeandtimes. I speak to librarian, games critic, and blogger Phil Salvador about his website The Obscuritory and his research and writing on games unplayed and unknown.

In a far-reaching interview, conducted in late February, and thus before the full brunt of the COVID pandemic hit the West , we explore the challenges, rewards, and lessons we've each found in writing about little-known areas of games history, as well as the importance of being kind and much, much more. This is the third entry in a new series of interviews I'm running alongside the main show — every month ish I'll talk to a different person who's exploring games history, in one way or another, to learn about the many ways people are preserving the games industry's past as well as to further our understanding of how this wonderful medium and the industry that's built around it has come to be the way it is now.

Or just search the show feed in your podcast player for episodes that begin with "Interview:". Links: Carly Kocurek she's been researching the girl games movement, amongst other things Control Monger freeware shooter game on Obscuritory Bring on the Old and Obscure at Archive.

Nintendo Power founding editor and former Nintendo of America marketing executive Gail Tilden remembers her beginnings at the company — before the NES, before Nintendo Power, and even before desktop publishing. How PS2 hit Bully aka Canis Canem Edit showed an alternate future for Rockstar and the open-world genre, with its compromised-yet-brilliant schoolyard satire — here I dive deep into the game, not for its overblown controversies but rather for its struggles against technological limitations and its triumphs in world-building, satire, and focused, more intimate and structured open-world game design.

And I wonder why, nearly 15 years on, open-world games continue to strive for bigger and bigger playgrounds filled with more and more trivial collectibles rather than building on the legacy of Bully's deliberate, glorious smallness. Interview: Alex aka Blackoak from Shmuplations. I speak to the creator of Shmuplations. This is the second entry in a new series of interviews I'm running alongside the main show — every month ish I'll talk to a different person who's exploring games history, in one way or another, to learn about the many ways people are preserving the games industry's past as well as to further our understanding of how this wonderful medium and the industry that's built around it has come to be the way it is now.

In war, no information is complete. No intelligence absolute. No view of the enemy unobstructed. It is a realm of uncertainty, where decisions are made on flawed and often outdated data — as though looking through a fog. Hence the term, the fog of war, a military phrase with origins in the musings of a 19th century Prussian general called Carl von Clausewitz.

Here's some great game design wisdom from one of the legends of the business. This interview excerpt is plucked from my set of Age of Empires history interviews that I did while putting together an oral history on the AoE series for Ars Technica a while back. Bruce Shelley has been in the industry for some odd years, with credits including co-creator of Sid Meier's Civilization, Railroad Tycoon, and Age of Empires, as well as key roles in Halo Wars and F Stealth Fighter, among other games.

You can also support the show financially — and get some bonus, ad-free content as a reward — with monthly donations on Patreon or Breaker, or either one-off or monthly donations on PayPal. Head to lifeandtimes. The sound designers from Age of Empires I and II, brothers Chris and Stephen Rippy, tell the story behind the iconic "wololo" priest chant — for converting enemy units to your side — that's since become a popular meme, as I delve into its strange legacy.

Music is a mix of my own stuff and a few tracks from the Age of Empires soundtrack, plus snippets from Babes Wodomu's Wololo, R. For more information about the show or how you can donate, as well as where to listen links, a web player, and partial transcripts to the episodes, head to my website at lifeandtimes. While I'm away on my honeymoon, here's my complete talk from PAX Australia , on the rise and fall of legendary shareware publisher Ambrosia Software — the most underrated of the '90s indie publishing giants.

So please, enjoy, and I'll see you in a couple of weeks. The synopsis: For Mac gamers in the 90s, the people of Ambrosia Software were rockstars. And with brilliant games like Maelstrom, Escape Velocity, Harry the Handsome Executive, Apeiron, and more, plus a company newsletter that spoke directly to the fans, they could do no wrong.

In light of Ambrosia's recent closure finally! And Dave said that exactly that, that he received the art. And they receive the artwork and Dave looked at it, and it looked like there was kind of a little crack where the cliff should maybe fall away. Or did I miss an email or something?

So then he, you know, he spent time animating that falling away and made it into this joke and it ended up being that kind of Sierra death jokes, which was always one of the best jokes in the game. But yeah, I mean, it was just so easy to die. And I think they were big against the frustration of dying. But I think the main thing for them when developing Mokey Island was that, the Sierra games were just… the deaths were just so unfair. You know, you had to work very hard to die in Monkey Island.

So I think that just that frustration of, you know, these unfair deaths really was something they wanted to avoid. And in fact, as you mentioned in the video, Ron published a sort of manifesto in — what was it called? Although, a couple of rules I did notice, I meant perhaps there are some Lucasfilm adventures did write their own rules down the line…. And obviously, as came up in the documentary that, you know, the Lucas adventure games did so much better in Europe for whatever reason. We just call it a spanner, I suppose, like an adjustable spanner, maybe?

Well, I can tell you as an American who played Monkey Island 2 not technically as an adult, maybe 18? I knew what a monkey wrench was. What was it, you have to…? And the solution to the puzzle is, elsewhere in the game on another island in a bar, there is a monkey playing a piano following a metronome.

A metronome, of course, being a thing that takes back and forth to keep your timing on the song. You have to put the banana on the metronome, which then hypnotizes this monkey. And now that the monkey is hypnotized, you can pick up the monkey and put it in your pocket. And that is your clue that the monkey can be used to adjust the water valve. Yes, I agree. I imagine it must. Whereas in Monkey Island, quite unusually, actually, straight away you get this three, the three tasks from the Scumm Bar.

And that, Dave even said, maybe that was too soon in the game. You know, let you let you kind of walk around a bit and this, that and the other, before kind of throwing you into that, but I liked it! I thought it was a great opening to the game. You walk into town. First thing you see is the Scumm Bar all lit up. And, you know, something that Ron talks about really often is the intro, right? Where Guybrush, the protagonist of the game, comes out of nowhere and he talks to the lookout by the fireplace just at the very beginning of the game.

And he said, one of the big influences with that was On Stranger Tides, the novel. So as Guybrush is learning about all these things in this world, and how things work and how to do this, that, and the other, the player is learning at the same time. So it just made, you know… I think it built that connection with Guybrush that much more.

I think that was a huge part of the of the character, and probably a huge part of why the game has stuck with people for so long. I think I agree with that. He is just this being that comes into existence when you start the game, who just has no history at all. I think we should backtrack just for a second to talk about sort of the evolution of where this idea came from. And then Ron, right after that pretty much, started trying to figure out what his next adventure game might be.

He had a few ideas and one of them was this pirate concept. And can you kind of explain from your interview where that came from? And then he kind of came to this realization that pirates is kind of bordering on fantasy, really.

Without the, you know, elves and dragons, and this, that and the other. Was that an inspiration for you know, this, that and the other? So like you said, he kind of landed on this pirates theme.

He had a couple other things he was pitching around at the time. Have you seen that one? That was a time travel adventure game where you were kind of bouncing between three time periods and your actions in one time period would then change, you know, the the futures ahead of you, which…. But yeah, so he sort of had this… So what they would pass around at the time, internally at Lucasfilm Games, were, they just called them one-sheets.

But these things were just passed around to all the —. But everyone in the company was encouraged to come up with game concepts. And a lot of those actually, surprisingly, have survived. Noah Falstein, who was one of the designers there, I think, mostly known for Fate of Atlantis at this point. He kept a ton of these as well. And one of those that Ron had written that he passed around was what he called Mutiny on Monkey Island. I know you read that one. Do you recall the sort of plot that he had?

Vaguely, because I did actually put it up on screen in my doc. But I know that originally it was going to be Governor Fat was, like, the antagonist? And the protagonist, I think, more importantly, was this seasoned-but-washed-up pirate who wanted to recapture his former glory.

And to your point here that it was the Tim Powers novel that that solidified that. So he was, you know, he started thinking about Monkey Island in the kind of nine months gap.

So it did make me wonder what would have happened without that gap? It may have been a very different game. Yeah, I think it would have been a very different game. So I think, you know, it would have been a very different game. Had he been able to proceed in And I really doubt it would have been nearly as memorable as it ended up being. Mm hmm. I know they were gonna have, you know, like ship battles, sea battles and everything in there.

And I and I suspect that it would have been, you know, the combat would have probably been similar to Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Yeah, so what they ended up doing, of course, in the Secret of Monkey Island, was replacing that sort of aactioney fighting that they had in Indiana Jones with insult sword fighting.

Which was much more in the spirit of an adventure game, right? And I thought that was a pretty clever way of using the dialogue choice mechanic of Monkey Island. And I think that really opened up not just Monkey Island but the way that adventure games proceeded after that point.

It was great. You know? Like, if I choose the funny line of dialogue, the game still gonna loop back around to actually keeping me on track and telling me the information I need to solve the game. Which, of course, would be the case in a lot of games.

And I think that the sort of freewheeling feeling of this game, it just feels like improv comedy in a lot of ways. And also, something that Ron said was, yeah, they would kind of try lots of things.

You had to lead the ants into another room so that they would do something, etc, etc, to get this idol. Really elaborate, strange puzzle solving. Just do it! It was interesting on your stream to see kind of a bit of, you know, what was planned for that puzzle beyond what actually ended up as. But it is still funny today. What Mark sort of spearheaded there is this notion of dithering to make the 16 color palette of the game look like it had more colors in it actually did.

Can you without visuals kind of explained to us how that worked? So if you have two colors, say a blue and a green, and you checker board dither them like that, then you can make the appearance or the illusion of extra colors. Especially, you know, because the pixels are very small, and they might be out in the background and what have you.

And it just makes the illusion of more colors because the original Monkey Island was, you know, color EGA. And as Mark puts it, there were sixteen horrible, useless colors.

So yeah, I mean, what what happened was, that Mark had been brought in and I think the first game he worked on was Zak McCracken — or maybe he might have done bits and bobs here and there? But you know, his first sort of meaty project was Zak McCracken. And if you look back at that game, it is very much sort of solid blocks of color. So I believe the way that the kind of the memory or disk space was was used up was, every time if you scan across the line of the picture horizontally, every time the color changed it would kind of register a bit of data.

And obviously, floppy disks are just under one-and-a-half meg. Because every time it goes across the checkerboard and that color changes! So for Zak McCracken, he had to use solid color. And then the next thing he did was Loom, so Loom between… In fact, it actually came out in , same year as Monkey Island. So obviously compressing it would take up less space. So then for Loom, they could use this dithered artwork.

And Mark said that a lot of people thought it was VGA, and it won loads of awards for the art and this and the other. But I think, from what he learned from that process, he really got to demonstrate in Monkey Island. And Mark had taken his home. And he done whatever work he needed to do. Sekis vediolar skachat. Atara collis patreon. Canon ir c driver. Mejores perfiles onlyfans. Linking to patreon on steam.

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Slc patreon. The below perks are what you get in exchange for helping to support my larger projects, such as my YouTube videos, music, shows, live streams, and cosplay shoots, none of which would ever see the light of day without your support.

So thank you! For my Monthly Live Chat streams, I will post a date and time, as well as a "save your spot" link of the event, to my Patreon feed. Most of my AMA live chat streams are held through my Crowdcast channel at the start of every month and usually last anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour.

It's a great place to get up to speed on my future plans, projects, and my life in general! You can also use this time to talk with me about literally anything you'd like. Oct 25, 2, I'm still not sure I've seen hype and marketing for a game that exceeded what was there for FF7. I mean I remember getting on a bus, where the entire bus was wrapped in a giant cloud FF7 advertisement, and every ad panel on the inside was FF7. That's just nuts. May 29, 3, Tiktaalik said:.

Mega Man Zero Member. Oct 27, 3, I was just listening to the Castlevania trilogy episode pocket 25 , and Bob mentions that the Director of Castlevania was Hitoshi Akamatsu.

Deleted member User requested account closure Banned. Oct 22, 13, The developer interviews you've been doing are great. I'm surprised with the new one with Becky Heineman that you didn't ask more about the bard's tale so we can start compiling a retronauts oral history on the game, esp. I've asked literally all the questions I can formulate for TBT.

Oct 25, 5, I believe the 20th anniversary of the Gameboy Retronauts podcast was the one where you talked about every handheld system not made by Nintendo. Man God Member. Oct 25, 30, Gameboy was such a cool looking gadget when it came out.

Really good tech stuff that I feel like a retro enthusiast could understand. Loved the code names being the default slip of the tongue, also the game boy was the 'z80" I'm def more on the side of game design, but the tech is so important Is that a first for retronauts?

I mean Wizard and the Princess is like episode 0 of King's Quest! Also Tass Times in Tone Town might be the only new wave game in existence? What was this 4am cracking thing though? SiG Member.

Oct 25, 6, Can we make episode suggestions in this thread? Oct 28, 4, SiG said:. Best podcast ever tbh. Only video game related pod I listen to at this point. JeremyParish thank you so much dude for creating Retronauts. You can! But we have episodes planned way the hell far out so I'm afraid we only take requests from patrons. What was that? Like the zelda fairy? An image of all the three together will help you better understand trimetric projection.

Oblique Projection It is the next sub-type of parallel projection. Here the governing concept is that the rays are not perpendicular to the plane on which we do projection. It is normally used for pictorial representation than for formal purposes. Well in both the cases, there are two axes that will be mutually perpendicular to each other, as shown in the figure.

And they will be drawn at a scale. The difference between these to projections are the angle they make with the projection plane. While cabinet projection makes Oct 27, Slovenia. Not trying to derail the thread here or anything, but has anyone found the old Bonus Stage videos? Because I had them all on an external hard drive and today I found that the drive doesn't work anymore. So I'm a bit heartbroken and would love, love, love to have those Bonus Stages again. What ever did come of that Retronauts DVD?

Been on such a Retronauts kick lately, and would love to watch, but can't find the YT vid in my Gmail for the life of me. Last edited: Apr 18, Current status of the DVDs is: I need to figure out how to import. Really want a read on Great Greed! Catching up: Started listening to Nausicaa when I was sick, immediately stopped listening when I heard there was a giant size hardcover release 40 bucks on Amazon and bought it immediately, read it all last Sunday, listened to the episode this week and immediately bought the Blu-Ray as well also in Theaters this summer so got tickets for that Another game clearly cribbing from Nausicaa is Xenoblade Chronicles 2, though its what if the manga had a happy ending.

It was funny as hell to have two Gameboy anniversary episodes where Heiankio Alien was not mentioned only for an entire panel talking about it. A Z80 based machine released in the late 80's that lasted more or less two entire console generations despite running out of steam right about when every other system did.

Mario at lunch with almost my entire English class. I also started buying kids entire Game Boy collections for dollars here and there and ended up getting the entire Play it Loud line plus many duplicates from people looking for a little loose change.

I even got some rather rare titles complete in box this way. I probably had about 50 copies of tetris by the time I was done with this. I had 4 copies of Wave Race so I could play that game fully linked. Rental shop episode is going to be a total nostalgia trip.

Oh man, I miss my local Microplay rental shop. Back in the mid 90's they had everything. You could rent a Virtual Boy, a Pico, a 32X. My mind could not process what I was seeing. Renting a Japanese PS1 and N64 months before launch was amazing. The store owners were so great. They let 13 year old me rent systems with no credit card on the account. Who would do that now? KillerDark Member. Oct 26, 1, Really enjoyed the Stardew episode from yesterday! Got me to start playing again and continue my save on Switch.

Such a great game and I liked how much everyone on the podcast was into it. My local store was the best. Rent on Saturday, keep until Monday. They moved four times until finally ending up in the back of a hardware store and they got out right as Blockbuster started encroaching in.

The moves were the best part though as they'd let you rent anything for a day for ten cents. Those same PC games were either dirt cheap to pick up, still worked fine, or had windows 98 specific programming which made them a pain in the ass to run elsewhere. Some tales from that era: Another small chain store in my area rented PC games until the law changed! That was a trip and a half. The good video game store near me would rent out the guide for another dollar and sometimes just threw it in for free.

Wasn't me. Records were spottier then. I didn't pay more than 12 dollars for any PS1 game those years. The rarest of rare occasions was a Saturday holiday, rent on Friday, keep it until Monday. A hurricane was supposed to be bearing down on my coastal town it missed us but gave some pretty heavy rain and my mom rented me a ton of GB games, which were never a big mover at the store but they had a decent collection and it was completely by her own initiative.

I remember playing Battletoads and a couple of other things and it was a really sweet memory. The first two games I ever beat were rentals. Mega Man 2 from the grocery store, Guerrilla War from the video rental store. I was so proud to beat MM2. Kamek Member. Oct 27, 2, I'm not a huge podcast listener, but I did enjoy the Video Store episode. Really enjoyed this weeks episode on hardware design. Can't wait until we find out what special type of plastic Pikachu was on those hideous N64's!

Also, I have the answer to a question that was asked on the podcast:. Avengers23 Banned. Oct 25, 21, Since he was a Retronauts guest, I'll ask here in lieu of a better place: whatever happened to the Chrontendo and Chronsega videos?

Gloam Member. Oct 29, 1, Avengers23 said:. This weeks Patreon advance episode:. Oct 25, Philadelphia. BocoDragon Banned. RE: browning Famicoms My Famicom is pretty white actually.

#27 - Kelsey Lewin from Pink Gorilla by Not So Common with Pat Contri • A podcast on Anchor

pretty much in ohio mostly til august with a few exceptions.. january chicago. february ithaca and new york city. april smoky mtn natl park. july rainbow. annual family campout. august ohio. maine. september denver, san francisco, portland, seattle, state ferry to alaska, yukon if we can get in to canada. Patreon is a membership platform that makes it easy for artists and creators to get paid. Join over ,+ creators earning salaries from over 4 million monthly patrons.  #27 - Kelsey Lewin from Pink Gorilla Kelsey Lewin speaks with Pat about retro game collecting, running the Pink Gorilla game store, video creation, and more!Check out sponsor Dollar Shave Club - Get a Razor for $1 with Free Shipping and – Listen to #27 - Kelsey Lewin from Pink Gorilla by Not So Common with Pat Contri instantly on your tablet, phone or browser - no downloads needed. Kelsey Lewin speaks with Pat about retro game collecting, running the Pink Gorilla game store, video creation, and more! Check out sponsor Dollar Shave Club - Get a Razor for $1 with Free Shipping and No Commitment! Check out sponsor That's It Fruit & Veggie Bars - use code NOTCOMMON and save 10%! These include Kelsey Lewin, John Riggs, Kinsey Burke, Radical Reggie and Drunken Master Paul. These videos include his console buying guides, Patreon questions and occasional gaming challenge videos. Personal Life. Jason current resides in his hometown Seattle, Washington DC. He lives with his wife Rebecca and their 2 dogs and 2 cats. Nov 11,  · Kelsey Lewin is the co-director of the Video Game History Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to preserving, celebrating, and teaching the history of video games. When not collecting, digitizing, and archiving game history, Kelsey is co-owner of Pink Gorilla Games, a chain of two video game retail stores in Seattle, Washington. 

Trivia Tower - Video Game History Trivia With Kelsey Lewin - Game videos

Trivia Tower – Video Game History Trivia With Kelsey Lewin

From there, he began uploading videos covering his game collection, music collection and live videos of him playing with his band, to fairly minimal views and subscribers. However, in July he made his first popular video, which was on the Atari Jaguar, which has garnered over k views as of April He continued to upload retro gaming videos regularly, with videos done on specific consoles such as the Xbox and PlayStation 2 becoming very popular.

Then in July , Jason's channel surpassed , subscribers, his first major milestone, and almost four years later in February , his channel reached , subscribers. His channel current has over , subscribers as of April Jason has lived in Seattle, Washington, all his life, and his videos almost always took place in his basement at his old home, which was where his game collection and setup was housed.

Ultimate leaks, the White House climate change report, outrage culture, and more! Follow Pat on twitter patthenespunkHelp support this content: Patreon.

Pat rambles about Halloween memories, candy, ghost stories, and more! Alex Faciane is one half of Super Beard Bros. He chats with Pat about YouTube burn out, the world ending, social media as a content creator, living in southern California, and more! Email notsocommon thepunkeffect. Pat goes over his , believing in Santa as a child, the Italian Feast of the Seven Fishes, and more!

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Follow Pat on twitter patthenespunk Help support this content: Patreon. Pat rambles about Halloween memories, candy, ghost stories, and more!

Alex Faciane is one half of Super Beard Bros. He chats with Pat about YouTube burn out, the world ending, social media as a content creator, living in southern California, and more!

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Homework First – The Gaming Historian

Jason created his channel in April , but didn't start uploading regularly until January , when he uploaded video of him showing his gaming room. From there, he began uploading videos covering his game collection, music collection and live videos of him playing with his band, to fairly minimal views and subscribers. However, in July he made his first popular video, which was on the Atari Jaguar, which has garnered over k views as of April He continued to upload retro gaming videos regularly, with videos done on specific consoles such as the Xbox and PlayStation 2 becoming very popular.

Then in July , Jason's channel surpassed , subscribers, his first major milestone, and almost four years later in February , his channel reached , subscribers. His channel current has over , subscribers as of April Jason has lived in Seattle, Washington, all his life, and his videos almost always took place in his basement at his old home, which was where his game collection and setup was housed. Then in late , Jason revealed that him and his wife were moving to a new house based on the outskirts of Seattle, which contained a much bigger basement containing three large rooms instead of just one room like his old house.

Sergio and I received a message from a listener on Instagram. We go through their comments, ideas for the game, and answer a question they asked us. I have created the Nintendo Fitness Challenge, over the course of 6 weeks, I aim to use Nintendo accessories and games as my sole source of exercise. In this video, I go over the rules of the challenge, my fitness goals, and of course, the games that I will be playing along the way.

I have been playing the game regularly for a week now and I have some thoughts on how it is going. This is the final Weekly Update for an indefinite amount of time. I am shifting my focus on other projects and am cutting out these videos to give myself more time to focus on new content. Thank you for watching these through and I hope you enjoy this special final episode. Kelsey Lewin: Yeah. The Strong in Rochester does have a research library.

They do have an archive. So, we do collect some of the same things, for sure. Lots of toys and games and that sort of thing. And I love your comment about magazines as well being this snapshot of time that lets you see what was important, what people were talking about back then.

You had quite the project there a few years ago because they have been basically hoarding all this information in their own archives.

And they invited you in to digitize a lot of that. Kelsey Lewin: Yeah, it does. So, it was, I mean, just floor to ceiling stuff. It was just stuff in a room. A lot of the initial part was just sorting things out. Taking inventory of what it all was that we had to work with. I think we identified 17 different media types that we had to work with.

I mean, things like dat tapes and mini discs and slides and transparencies and just all kinds of… In addition to the obvious things like paper and CDRs, all of that kind of stuff. Kelsey Lewin: And yeah, they wanted the former editor in chief Andy McNamara was very… He thought it was very important that since they were the only magazine that was both still standing and had been keeping all of this stuff for a long time, that we preserved this snapshot of media history and video games.

I mean, they have the most complete snapshot of what the video game press was for a good 20 year period. Kelsey Lewin: I mean, when you look at something like a press release, you can get not just some information about the game that you might already know. But you get also like, what was the company trying to do with this game?

What did they think the selling points were? What did they think that other people should notice and see about this game? I was recently cleaning my house and I found a binder of three and a half inch floppy disks that Sony distributed at E Ken Gagne: It took like half a dozen floppy disks to distribute all those screenshots. And so, I sent those to the Strong Museum of Play.

Kelsey Lewin: Yeah, exactly. And I mean, especially when you deal with not even just like your favorite games or whatever. But it can also be something like an unreleased game.

And maybe just, no one ever really covered it, or there was one screenshot and a little blurb, and that was it. But it turns out that they actually sent quite a bunch of stuff about it. I mean, this is how we learn about the things that never existed. Ken Gagne: Now, Game Informer, of course, had this room that not just anybody could walk into. And now a lot of that material is digital. Who has access to the digital versions now or who will?

Kelsey Lewin: So, Game Informer still has access to all of it digitally. We gave them a complete copy of everything we had digitized. Because it was a team of six of us for five weeks straight working every single day. And usually Frank and I would leave, and just take some paper with us back to the hotel and continue working. We got through a lot of it. And unfortunately, GameStop or Game Informer owns all of that right now. But when you are dealing with such a wealth of information coming from so many different media, as you described, how do you organize it?

Are you just throwing it into folders? Are you tagging it? Is there some sort of a digital asset management program? So, for right now, especially with the Game Informer project, we just had to work as fast as we can.

So, we were like in order to… That part can be done later, the tagging and all of that can be done later. What needs to happen is the first pass is the digitization. We have identified a management system for all of that. But we have identified the place that it is going to go live and get tagged and all of that stuff, eventually. Ken Gagne: Very cool. So, in addition to magazines, the Video Game History Foundation has recently focused on source code with the Video Game Source Project, which is announced just last month in October of For those who, again, are not familiar, what would you describe as source code or source?

So, and we specifically left out the code part of source code because I want to try to make it as broad as possible. Video game source is all of the pieces you need to actually assemble the final game. And all of these things exist in one repository, in theory, and you have all of the pieces that go into the final game.

But what makes the source so potentially interesting is that not only do you have all of the final pieces of the game, but you often have a lot of the not final or scrapped or commented out pieces of the game.

Kelsey Lewin: So, you have a better… A good archive of video game source. A good source repository can really help show a historian some of the decisions that maybe went into making this game. It can kind of illuminate the course of the game.

Just kind of what went on when they were building it, what changed, maybe what got improved, what got cut. So, you can learn a lot. If you have access to it, not only can you learn a lot about the game itself, but you can even theoretically completely recreate the game from scratch.

Ken Gagne: Thank you. Just like how you can make a video game without being a programmer because there are so many other roles like art designer, narrative creator, etc.

Presumably, this was also material that the Video Game History Foundation was receptive to beforehand. So, what is new about this formal establishment of a project?

I think a lot of people can understand why a prototype game or whatever might be valuable, but not a lot of people understand or are even conscious of the idea of source code. People want that? People want to look at that? So things like the video game industry is very, very secretive, and much more so than the movie industry and the music industry and stuff, even though you might not think so. And the understandable part of this is that, like I alluded to earlier, if you have the source code, you can theoretically recreate the entire game.

I mean, you could have the script and you can have the set and all of that stuff. Ken Gagne: Right. Yeah, the website for the Video Game Source Project lists some of these challenges, including trade secrecy, entropy, a lack of awareness.

Would you say one of those challenges is the one you encounter the most, or is the hardest to overcome? Kelsey Lewin: I think overall, the most difficult one is going to be the trade secrecy one. It means that people can write books about their game and write articles and documentaries, and that sort of thing. They can get a lot more interesting history out of it, and maybe even elevate their game. Kelsey Lewin: But the thing that is tough is that when some people hear preservation, and I totally get this, they want everything to be open source.

And believe me, I would love everything to be open source. Not everyone even does that. We want to have there be a path for studying this stuff. We want there to be a library clause for source code just like there is for a lot of things. But if you have an account with LexisNexis, or something like that, you can get access to it. Ken Gagne: This makes perfect sense. They have to be or else they set a precedent where their copyright is no longer enforced. Kelsey Lewin: Right, exactly. So, I mean, yeah, to go back to your initial question, yes, you can absolutely give things to us for safekeeping.

And we can keep it dark for a long time until we figure out how we can legally make these things accessible. I believe with your source of Aladdin, there was quite a corporate benefit to that as well. I mean, I say researchers very broadly. But yeah, I mean, when we… So, we had the source code for Aladdin, for the Genesis in our archive, and it was actually used by Disney. Disney no longer had this source code. So much like they go to the Library of Congress for their film nitrates when they want to remaster a movie, they had to come to the Video Game History Foundation to make this game.

And we actually, one of our staff wrote a really incredible article about just all the secrets that he found in the Aladdin game, in the Aladdin source code like cut enemies and cut functions and that sort of thing.

Ken Gagne: That is amazing. I will need to go buy that. And it was also very successful. It was a game that sold pretty well for Disney. This is not something that they released into the world. And so, I can imagine that might make your job more difficult where companies are now going to become more locked down and more restrictive to prevent events like that from happening again.

But that actually is pretty much exactly what my first thought was when it happened was that this was going to make our jobs a little more difficult. Ken Gagne: Well, good. We just need to get them excited about legal collaboration as well. Ken Gagne: Well, there are some, and you recently had a collaboration of your own with the famous game designer, Ron Gilbert of Monkey Island and Maniac Mansion fame. I attended that event. I thought it went well.

How do you feel it went? Kelsey Lewin: Yeah, I really, really enjoyed it.

ChuyPlaysNintendo

Kelsey Lewin is the co-director of the Video Game History Foundationa non-profit dedicated to preserving, celebrating, and teaching the history of video games. When not collecting, digitizing, and archiving game history, Kelsey is co-owner of Pink Gorilla Gamesa chain of two video game retail stores in Seattle, Washington.

How does copyright come into play? And what can modern developers do to ensure their code is preserved? Finally, we pivot to chat about the state of retail in a digital age and in the midst of a pandemic. Click past the jump for a transcript and links to resources mentioned in this episode.

Podcast: Download Duration: — Voiceover: Welcome to the Polygamer podcast, where gaming is for everyone. Join us as we expand the boundaries of the gaming community.

Two aspects of video gaming that I love besides video gaming itself, of course, are the history of it.

So many books have been written. Ken Gagne: And also retail. Hello, Kelsey. I have had communications with your colleague Frank, the founder of the Video Game History Foundation. We have so much to chat about today. What is the VGHF? But we are hoping to change that. Kelsey Lewin: Not so much that people can visit, although we do host researchers. We have an office and an archive. Ken Gagne: And do I understand that your collection is primarily on the digital side as opposed to physical artifacts?

So, the office itself and the archive itself is Kelsey lewins patreon and tons of physical stuff. But 10, magazines, from all over. Kelsey Lewin: We have several developer collections, which can include digital assets, but also things like concept art and correspondence between different people, and technical notes, and all kinds of paperwork, and fun stuff like that.

So we do have a very large physical archive. Ken Kelsey lewins patreon Gotcha. Is that correct? Kelsey Lewin: Kelsey lewins patreon, yeah. Kelsey Lewin: Yeah. The Strong in Rochester does have a research library. They do have an archive. So, we do collect some of the same things, for sure. Lots of toys and games and that sort of thing. And I love your comment about magazines as well being this snapshot of time that lets you see what was important, what people were talking about back then.

You had quite the project there a few years ago because they have been basically hoarding all this information in their Kelsey lewins patreon archives. And they invited you in to digitize a lot of that. Kelsey Lewin: Yeah, it does. So, it was, I mean, just floor to ceiling stuff.

It was just stuff in a room. A lot of the initial part was just sorting things out. Taking inventory of what it all was that we had to work with. I think we identified 17 different media types that we had to work with. I mean, things like dat tapes and mini discs and slides and transparencies and just all kinds of… In addition to the obvious things like paper and CDRs, all of that kind of stuff.

Kelsey Lewin: And yeah, they wanted the former editor in chief Andy McNamara was very… He thought it was very important that since they were the only magazine that was both still standing and had been keeping all of this stuff for a long time, that we preserved this snapshot of media history and video games.

I mean, they have the most complete snapshot of what the video game press was for a good 20 year period. Kelsey Lewin: I mean, when you look at something like a press release, you can get not just some information about the game that you might already know. But you get also like, what was the company trying to do with this game?

What did they think the selling points were? What did they think that other people should notice and see about this game?

I was recently cleaning my house and I found a binder of three and a half inch floppy disks that Sony distributed at E Ken Gagne: It took like half a dozen floppy disks to distribute all those screenshots. And so, I sent those to the Strong Museum of Play.

Kelsey Lewin: Yeah, exactly. And I mean, especially when you deal with not even just like your favorite games or whatever. But it can also be something like an unreleased Kelsey lewins patreon. And maybe just, no one ever really covered it, or there was one screenshot and a little blurb, and that was it.

But it turns out that they actually sent quite a bunch of stuff about Kelsey lewins patreon. I mean, this is how we learn about the things that never existed. Ken Gagne: Now, Game Informer, of course, had this room that not just anybody could walk into. And now a lot of that material is digital. Who has access to the digital versions now or who will?

Kelsey Lewin: So, Game Informer still has access to all of it digitally. We gave them a complete copy of everything we had digitized. Because it was a team of six of us for five weeks straight working every single day. And usually Frank and I would leave, and just take some paper with us back to the hotel and continue working.

We got through a lot of Kelsey lewins patreon. And unfortunately, GameStop or Game Informer owns all of that right now. But when you are dealing Kelsey lewins patreon such a wealth of information coming from so many different media, as you described, how do you organize it?

Are you just throwing it into folders? Are you tagging it? Kelsey lewins patreon there some sort of a digital asset management program?

So, for right now, especially with the Game Informer project, we just had to work as fast as we can. So, we were like in order to… That part can be done later, the tagging and all of that can be done later. What needs to happen is the first pass is the digitization. We Kelsey lewins patreon identified a management system for all of that. But we have identified the place that it is going to go live and get tagged and all of that stuff, eventually.

Ken Gagne: Very cool. So, in addition to magazines, the Video Game History Foundation has recently focused on source code with the Video Game Source Project, which is announced just last month in October of For those who, again, are not familiar, what would you describe as source code or source? So, and we specifically left out the code part of source code because I want to try to Kelsey lewins patreon it as broad as possible.

Video game source is all of the pieces you need to actually assemble the final game. And all of these things exist in one repository, in theory, and you have all of the pieces that go into the final game. But what makes the Kelsey lewins patreon so potentially interesting is that not only do you have all of the final pieces of the game, but you often have a lot of the not final or scrapped or commented out pieces of the game.

Kelsey Lewin: So, you have a better… A good archive of video game source. A good source repository can really help show a historian some of the decisions that maybe went into making this game. It can kind of illuminate the course of the game. Just kind of what went on when they were building it, what changed, maybe what got improved, Kelsey lewins patreon got cut. So, you can learn a lot.

If you have access to it, not only can you learn a lot about the game itself, but you can even theoretically completely recreate the game from scratch. Ken Gagne: Thank you. Just like how you can make a video game without being a programmer because there are so many other roles like art designer, narrative creator, etc. Presumably, this was also Kelsey lewins patreon that the Video Game History Foundation was receptive to beforehand.

So, what is new about this formal establishment of Kelsey lewins patreon project? I think a lot of people can understand why a prototype game or whatever might be valuable, but not a lot of people understand or are even conscious of the idea of source code.

People want that? People want to look at that? So things like the video game industry is very, very secretive, and much more so than the movie industry and the music industry and stuff, even though you might not think so. And the understandable part of this is that, like I alluded to earlier, if you have the source code, you can theoretically recreate the entire game.

I mean, you could have the script and you can have the set and all of that stuff. Ken Gagne: Right.

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Kelsey Lewin: Yeah. Ken Gagne: Gotcha. Listen on. Email Required Name Required Website. Do you have any future guests you want to share with us? I mean, you could have the script and you can have the set and all of that stuff.